Consider The School District When Buying

As you begin your home search, there are plenty of things you already know to factor in the decision: price, neighborhood attributes,  beds and baths, square footage, and proximity to work. But have you considered looking into which school districts are round the neighborhood you’re searching? In Seattle as we know many new homeowners aren’t planning on having children anytime soon or maybe not at all, but this doesn’t mean that you should cast the school district factor aside; even if you do not have children or do not plan to, the quality of education nearby can greatly affect how much you pay for your home, and how much you can expect to sell it for in the future. You’ll pay more for your home if it is within a good school district. Parents of school age children are always searching for high school ratings, and often will pay more to live in a zoned neighborhood within a highly rated district. A good school district can also protect you from the ups and downs of the real estate market; even in an unpredictable market, a home in a great school district will likely see nearby home values staying consistent or above the median. This will protect you when it comes time for the resale, and although there are no guarantees, you can rest assured parents will always be looking to move to the best neighborhoods with the top schools. For more information on Seattle real estate, please contact your local agent today.

Check out our “Neighborhood Schools” tab above for more information on the schools in the Capitol Hill neighborhood!

Capitol Hill Real Estate Report – July 2017

 

Past Sold Listing in Capitol Hill

Just like Seattle’s weather the real estate market in Capitol Hill continues to stay hot. There were 23 single-family homes sold last month and 38 condos. The average list price for a single-family home climbed from $975,595 (7/2016) to $1,052,900 (7/2017). The highest cost for a home jumped from $1,925,000 (2016) to $2,550,000 (2017), the lowest as also spiked from $500,000 to $645,000. There are currently 17 active listings and 24 pending.

Past Sold Listing in Capitol Hill

Condos have also shown growth in the Capitol Hill, Seattle area. The average list price for a condo in the Capitol Hill neighborhood has jumped from $432,094 in July of 2016 to $533,034 this past month (July 2017). The highest sold price was $3,050,000, $1.45 million more than July 2016. The median price for a condo has gone up from $392,000 to $510,000. There are currently 12 active listing and 34 pending.

 

Tips for Spring Sellers!

 

The flowers are starting to bud, and the sun is peaking through the clouds (on some days); Spring is in the air and For Sale signs are emerging around Seattle. How do you stay ahead of the game? As the housing market begins to heat up, sellers can take these extra steps to help stand out among the rest. At first glance, potential buyers are scrutinizing your property before they even step foot in the door, and having a clean entrance and yard can make a big difference for first impressions.  Adding a beautiful potted plant to the front porch, or staining the front deck could be relatively small projects that could add generous appeal to your home.

Staging your home is another great way to entice buyers to choose your home. Hiring professionals to arrange your home to appeal to a broad array of buyers could be the difference between a buyer choosing your home, or choosing one just down the street. Removing personal belongings helps buyers envision themselves living on the property- not you. Also remember to give your home a good cleaning before showings; a clean home feels bigger and more inviting.

For more information on Seattle real estate, contact your local real estate agent today.

North Capitol Hill Home New to the Market!

klosh1115-60

This quintessential North Capitol Hill Tudor sits privately above the street on coveted 22nd Avenue East, one of Seattle’s finest blocks. Generosity and flow of space are the key elements making this home both luxurious and functional.

The expansive but private front porch is a room of its own–a great spot for breakfast or an evening read. The large, sun-filled living room boasts classic Tudor-style details: original stained glass and leaded windows, beamed ceilings, and a wood burning fireplace framed by a substantial mantel and built-ins. Off the living room is a cozy study with a gas fireplace.

Perfect for entertaining, the spacious dining room is conveniently open to the living area, kitchen, and breakfast room. The chef’s kitchen is well equipped with a commercial range combo–6 burner gas cooktop, double oven, broiler, and griddle–plus ample counter and storage space, counter eating, and a cook’s desk. Just off the kitchen and breakfast room, a decked garden space is lush with mature shrubs, trees, and vines.

The 2nd level features the bright and spacious master suite with walk-in closet, finished sunporch, and full bath; two more bedrooms, one with in-suite bathroom; a stately office with gas fireplace; a 3rd full bath; and hall closet space.

The 3rd level is complete with two large bedrooms, both with a pair of built-in single beds; a full bathroom; craft/work room; large storage room; and another large closet. In keeping with this home’s spacious overall feel, the basement level hosts a sizeable recreation room warmed by a wood burning fireplace; a huge, open laundry area with laundry chute and closet; and, of course, plenty of additional storage space.

Nearby shops and restaurants, parks, excellent schools (both private and public), 10 minutes to downtown, this home meets all your needs and more. Make this your forever home.

Former Value Village Could Become an Open Public Market

 

Cap Hill MArket 5-18

Legacy Commercial and architecture firm Ankrom Moisan released their plans for the redevelopment of the Kelly Springfield Building (formally a Value Village) to the Pike / Pine Neighborhood Council on Monday.

The project aims to create 65,000 square feet of new office space, which will be split between a proposed three-story addition atop the Kelly Springfield Building, and a new, narrow, five-story building.  This new building will be built directly south of the Kelly Springfield Building on what is now a sunken parking lot.

Due to the Kelly Springfield Building status as a Seattle City Landmarks, Legacy Commercial, and Ankrom Moisan must have all of their plans approved by the city’s Architectural Review Committee.  The committee is instant upon the preservation of the building’s brick façade and also committed maintaining a public, retail ruse on the building’s ground floor.  Taking this into consideration, developers from Legacy Commercial are exploring the possibility of transforming the 12,000-square-foot ground floor into an open, food and retail destination, similar to Melrose Market.

Ankrom Moisan and Legacy will be providing its latest design proposal to the Early Design Guidance Review Board (EDG) on Wednesday, June 8, in the Student Center 210 Multipurpose Room of Seattle University, 1000 E. James Way.

Charette to Draw Public Input for Big Lid

 Marchers against I-5 construction, downtown Seattle, June 1, 1961 Museum of History & Industry


Marchers against I-5 construction, downtown Seattle, June 1, 1961
Museum of History & Industry

In 1967, the last phase of Interstate 5 opened. The freeway, which was designed to link Vancouver, Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, demolished anything that fell within its path and nowhere was this more destructive than in Seattle. Rather than cut through downtown, or climb through the hills and ridges directly surrounding the city, planners selected a course of least resistance for 1-5 in Seattle. In 1957, more than seven blocks of residences and retail businesses on the east side of Eastlake were razed to make way for the Interstate. The freeway eliminated the bottom portion of the Republican Street Hillclimb, a stairway leading from Cascade to Capitol Hill built in 1910. South of the Ship Canal Bridge Interstate 5 separates the Eastlake and Cascade neighborhoods from the Capitol Hill neighborhood and separates Downtown Seattle from the Capitol Hill and First Hill neighborhoods. Its construction necessitated the demolition of significantly developed areas and cut off walking commutes to downtown for many First Hill and Capitol Hill residents.
Since its completion, there has been significant interest in placing a lid over the portion of I-5 that cuts through Seattle. An early attempt at this can be seen in Lawrence Halprin‘s Freeway Park, which opened in 1976. This Saturday, May 7th, a design charrette (a collaborative session where designers and stakeholders work to draft proposals to solve a design problem) is being held by the Pike/Pine Urban Neighborhood Council to gather ideas that could materialize into an actual lid.
The charrette will take place at 12th Ave Arts this Saturday, May 7th, from 8 AM to 1 PM (coffee and High 5 Pie provided). Attendees will be armed with markers and tracing paper over a blown up image of the I-5 corridor to draw up their best ideas for a lid. Organizers have also compiled packets of materials reviewing existing lids in Seattle and around the U.S.
Pine Street Group developers will next go before the Seattle Design Commission on June 7th, where public benefits for the WSCC addition will be discussed. Commissioners are not expected to take any action. However, the commission will consider materials submitted by the community ahead of the meeting, creating an ideal opportunity to present the results of Saturday’s charrette.

Legal Battle Over Convention Center Expansion Continues

 

A rendering of the proposed convention center expansion.

A rendering of the proposed convention center expansion.

The massive expansion being undertaken at Washington State Convention Center remains in limbo as a heated legal battle between the convention center and Skanska-Hunt continues. The conflict between the two parties originated in March, when Skanska-Hunt, the construction company the Washington State Convention Center Public Facilities District hired in 2015 for the $1.4 billion expansion, was dropped from the expansion project. In response, Skanska-Hunt filed a lawsuit in King County Superior Court, which aims to stop convention center officials from beginning another contractor selection process.

On Wednesday King County Judge Beth Andrus denied Skanska-Hunt’s appeal to be reinstated as the contractor. The larger issue of whether the convention center authority wrongly terminated Skanska-Hunt, will be decided in a trial to take place within the next four months. During the trial, Judge Andrus has granted Skanska-Hunt’s request to stop the convention center officials from finding a new contractor.

The grounds of Skanska-Hunt’s termination are at the center of this case.  The construction company called the dismissal “shocking and tremendously disappointing.” Arguing further that:

“We have operated in a professional manner consistent with our corporate values and in the best interest of the Washington State Taxpayers who will ultimately fund this $1.4B project, the statement said. The services, which we have provided WSCC, are consistent with the manner in which we have delivered similar projects for the cities of San Francisco, Phoenix, San Antonio, San Jose, Seattle and others over the past decade.”

Pine Street Group, which is serving as the expansion’s project manager, believes that Skanska-Hint is perhaps “not the right fit for the project.”

Despite the common process for publically funded projects to select contractors based on price, the convention center chose Skanska-Hunt for a variety reasons.  According to Judge Andrus’ ruling, the convention center dropped Skanska-Hunt in order to peruse a cheaper option.

The Washington State Convention Center expansion is expected will increase the center’s exhibition and meeting space to 1.2 million square-feet.  A 30-story residential tower, a 16-story office building, and new retail and public spaces are also part of the project. Despite the legal issues currently playing out, the project is still slotted to break ground in 2017.

Harvard / Belmont Landmark District Walking Tour

Harvard_Belmont HIstoric District

Spend Saturday, April 9th peering into the glamorous history of Capitol Hill’s Harvard / Belmont Landmark District. Designated in 1980, the district boasts an inventory of impressive estates as well as numerous smaller, but nevertheless charming, homes.

By the early twentieth century, Capitol Hill’s central location yet pastoral streets were attracting affluent families away from the increasingly commercial Frist Hill, arguably Seattle’s first fashionable neighborhood.  Horace Chapin Henry, the venerable Seattle businessman and founder of the Henry Art Gallery, is credited with commissioning the neighborhood’s first substantial house.  Designed by Bebb & Gould, a prominent Seattle firm responsible for the Seattle Asian Art Museum and the Olympic Hotel, the house was completed in 1901 and featured a five-car garage, a novel amenity for a time when automobiles were just appearing on the city’s streets.  The scale of Henry’s home, which unfortunately was demolished in 1936, set an impressive precedent for other affluent Seattleites commissioning homes in the area.

Characteristic of urban development in the early twentieth century, the homes in the Harvard / Belmont district run the gamete in terms of architectural style.  Among the buildings of primary significance, however, are numerous residences undoubtedly influenced by the English architect Richard Norman Shaw.  While Shaw was essentially an eclectic architect, his projects that held the most influence for American designers  were a series of picturesque country houses that derived from a careful study of sixteenth-century English manorial architecture.  The half-timbering, hanging tiles, projecting gables, massive chimney blocks, and asymmetry of Shaw’s work can be felt throughout the Harvard / Belmont District, but especially in the M. H. Young House, the C. H. Bacon House, the J. A. Kerr House, and the W. L. Rhodes House

Whether you go for the early-twentieth century gossip, the plethora of beautiful and architecturally significant houses, or just for the walk, the important thing is to go, as you will not want to miss this glance into the fascinating history of the Harvard / Belmont Landmark District.

Details

Tours are approximately 2 hours and run rain or shine, dress accordingly! Advance registration is strongly encouraged; walk-ups are limited to space available for a cost of $25 (cash only/exact change required). For more information on SAF tours, visit their FAQ page (http://seattlearchitecture.org/tours/tours-faq/) or call 206-667-9184.

 

First Hill Walking Tour

 

The historic fireside room at the Sorrento Hotel serves as the final stop on tour.

The historic fireside room at the Sorrento Hotel serves as the final stop on tour.

On Tuesday, March 8th Historic Seattle, publisher of Tradition and Change on Seattle’s First Hill: Propriety, Profanity, Pills, and Preservation in 2014, is offering a walking tour of First Hill.

Directly adjacent to Capitol Hill’s busy Pike and Pine retail corridors, First Hill may seem like little more than a neighborhood of hospitals. At the close of the nineteenth century, however, First Hill was one of Seattle’s first “it” neighborhoods. Offering commanding views of the fledgling city center, as well an abundant supply of fresh water provided by streams and springs, First Hill attracted many of city’s wealthiest residents who built imposing houses in the varied and exotic architectural styles popular at the turn of past century. At the height of its social cache, First Hill boasted approximately 40 stately residences, home to such influential Seattle names as Terry, Minor, Hanford, Burke, Lowman, Frye, Pigott, Malmo, and Denny. To accommodate the influx of moneyed residents, exclusive social clubs, churches, and restaurants were also built.

First Hill’s reputation as a prestigious residential district fell victim to urban growth. During the interwar period, the neighborhood began a quick transition into a largely institutional and commercial district, with Virginia Mason establishing its first foothold in the area in 1920. Today, most of First Hill’s mansions have been demolished, but a few remain, including the Stimson-Green Mansion, now operated by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation (http://preservewa.org/Tours.aspx/).

Tuesday’s walking tour will include the Frye Art Museum, Saint James Cathedral, H.H. Dearborn House, Stimson-Green Mansion, Piedmont Hotel (now Tuscany Apartments), First Baptist Church, Fire Station No. 25, the Sorrento Hotel, among other properties. The tour will provide insight into the development of First Hill and changes the neighborhood has faced over the past century.

Details

Date: March 8th, 2016

Time: 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Venue: Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Avenue

Tickets: $35 general public / $25 Historic Seattle members

https://app.etapestry.com/cart/HistoricSeattle/default/item.php?ref=564.0.1269332

Cab Driver Robbed at Gun Point

policeA cab driver was flagged down by a potential fare around 3:00am this morning near the intersection of 12th Avenue South and South Main Street. The 21 year old suspect got in the car and as he and the driver began talking two more suspects entered the cab, pulled out hand guns and demanded money from the driver. They pistol whipped the driver in the head but he was able to jump out of the car, run away and call 911. The suspects stole the driver’s cell phone and GPS unit before getting out of the cab and into two separate waiting vehicles.

Officers arrived within minutes of the driver calling 911. Police stopped a Chevy Caprice a few blocks away with five men in the vehicle. The driver of the vehicle gave officers permission to search the car. Officers found two hand guns, one reported stolen, and the GPS unit from the cab. The cab driver was able to positively identify the main 21 year old suspect despite suffering cuts and bruises to his head. The other men were identified and released.

The 21 year old suspect was arrested and transported to the East Precinct where while in a holding cell he attempted to dispose of a baggie containing methamphetamines. He was later booked into the King County Jail for robbery and felony drugs.

Robbery detectives are following up on the investigation and attempting to locate the other suspects. Please contact the Seattle Police Department if you have any information regarding the incident.