Seattle Restaurant Week Is Back And Better Than Ever

Today marks the start of the tastiest week of the season- the triumphant return of Seattle Restaurant Week!

We here in Seattle are so blessed with an abundance of fabulous dining options, ranging from simple and inexpensive to exotic, lavish and extraordinary, which usually doesn’t come too cheap. Seattle Restaurant Week is an opportunity for people to explore many incredible restaurants they may not normally spring for by offering fabulous deals you won’t want to miss out on.

Every Sunday through Thursday from April 2nd to April 19th, over 165 restaurants across the city will be offering up $33 three-course dinners, with many also offering $18 two-course lunches as well. These restaurants range in price, type of cuisine and location, giving you tons of options to choose from, in every department!

To maximize your SRW experience, check out a list of participating restaurants here (click on the name of the restaurants to see their location and view their SRW exclusive menu) and be sure to check out The Seattle Times lists of best overall value, best ambiance, neighborhood favorites and SRW newcomers.

If you are going to explore SRW (which we highly recommend you do!), remember to be patient, make reservations and tip your servers well! While SRW is a great opportunity for diners, restaurants do tend to get swamped, and the nicer and more understanding we are as patrons, the better the experience for everyone!

Now, go out and get a healthy dose of YUM, before it’s too late!

Hammershøi and His Contemporaries Lecture Series Begins August Second

800px-Vilhelm_Hammershoi_-_Interieur_mit_Rueckenansicht_einer_Frau_-_1903-1904_-_Randers_Kunstmuseum

Interior with Young Woman from Behind (1904)

In tandem with the Frye Art Museum’s current exhibition, Chronicles of Solitude: Masterworks by Vilhelm Hammershøi from SMK—The National Gallery of Denmark, the Nordic Heritage Museum and the Frye Art Museum are collaborating on a public lecture series titled Hammershøi and His Contemporaries. Comprised of four lectures, the series examines the four major genres represented in Hammershøi’s oeuvre: portraits, interior spaces, landscapes, and cityscapes.

Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916), whose work was much admired by his contemporaries both in Europe and the United States, is best known for his paintings of sparse, light-filled interiors. Rendered in a strict palette of colors, Hammershøi’s canvases are reminiscent of Dutch Baroque paintings in their handling of light and subject matter. Owing to this mastery, German critic Georg Biermann described Hammershøi in 1909 as a “modern Nordic Vermeer.”

The first lecture in the Hammershøi and His Contemporaries series will be held August Second at 9:30 am in the Frye auditorium.

Cost for series: $110 for NHM and Frye members, $170 general admission

Register Here

First Hill Walking Tour

 

The historic fireside room at the Sorrento Hotel serves as the final stop on tour.

The historic fireside room at the Sorrento Hotel serves as the final stop on tour.

On Tuesday, March 8th Historic Seattle, publisher of Tradition and Change on Seattle’s First Hill: Propriety, Profanity, Pills, and Preservation in 2014, is offering a walking tour of First Hill.

Directly adjacent to Capitol Hill’s busy Pike and Pine retail corridors, First Hill may seem like little more than a neighborhood of hospitals. At the close of the nineteenth century, however, First Hill was one of Seattle’s first “it” neighborhoods. Offering commanding views of the fledgling city center, as well an abundant supply of fresh water provided by streams and springs, First Hill attracted many of city’s wealthiest residents who built imposing houses in the varied and exotic architectural styles popular at the turn of past century. At the height of its social cache, First Hill boasted approximately 40 stately residences, home to such influential Seattle names as Terry, Minor, Hanford, Burke, Lowman, Frye, Pigott, Malmo, and Denny. To accommodate the influx of moneyed residents, exclusive social clubs, churches, and restaurants were also built.

First Hill’s reputation as a prestigious residential district fell victim to urban growth. During the interwar period, the neighborhood began a quick transition into a largely institutional and commercial district, with Virginia Mason establishing its first foothold in the area in 1920. Today, most of First Hill’s mansions have been demolished, but a few remain, including the Stimson-Green Mansion, now operated by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation (http://preservewa.org/Tours.aspx/).

Tuesday’s walking tour will include the Frye Art Museum, Saint James Cathedral, H.H. Dearborn House, Stimson-Green Mansion, Piedmont Hotel (now Tuscany Apartments), First Baptist Church, Fire Station No. 25, the Sorrento Hotel, among other properties. The tour will provide insight into the development of First Hill and changes the neighborhood has faced over the past century.

Details

Date: March 8th, 2016

Time: 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Venue: Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Avenue

Tickets: $35 general public / $25 Historic Seattle members

https://app.etapestry.com/cart/HistoricSeattle/default/item.php?ref=564.0.1269332

SummeRun & Walk Happening This Weekend

The SummeRun & Walk for Ovarian Cancer is happening this Sunday, July 24th.  The SummerRun & Walk is a 5k event presented by Swedish Hospital.   The event was created by Dr. Saul Rivkin, M.D., of The Rivkin Center, a research organization dedicated to ovarian cancer. If you would like to participate in the event, you can register for $35.00 in person beginning at 6:30 am.  Registration and race warm up will take place at the intersection of Marion and Minor Streets next to Swedish Hospital.  If you are not running or walking, you can donate to participants or teams on the official website, or simply show up to offer your support on the sidelines.  For more information, please visit SummeRun & Walk website.