North Capitol Hill Home New to the Market!


This quintessential North Capitol Hill Tudor sits privately above the street on coveted 22nd Avenue East, one of Seattle’s finest blocks. Generosity and flow of space are the key elements making this home both luxurious and functional.

The expansive but private front porch is a room of its own–a great spot for breakfast or an evening read. The large, sun-filled living room boasts classic Tudor-style details: original stained glass and leaded windows, beamed ceilings, and a wood burning fireplace framed by a substantial mantel and built-ins. Off the living room is a cozy study with a gas fireplace.

Perfect for entertaining, the spacious dining room is conveniently open to the living area, kitchen, and breakfast room. The chef’s kitchen is well equipped with a commercial range combo–6 burner gas cooktop, double oven, broiler, and griddle–plus ample counter and storage space, counter eating, and a cook’s desk. Just off the kitchen and breakfast room, a decked garden space is lush with mature shrubs, trees, and vines.

The 2nd level features the bright and spacious master suite with walk-in closet, finished sunporch, and full bath; two more bedrooms, one with in-suite bathroom; a stately office with gas fireplace; a 3rd full bath; and hall closet space.

The 3rd level is complete with two large bedrooms, both with a pair of built-in single beds; a full bathroom; craft/work room; large storage room; and another large closet. In keeping with this home’s spacious overall feel, the basement level hosts a sizeable recreation room warmed by a wood burning fireplace; a huge, open laundry area with laundry chute and closet; and, of course, plenty of additional storage space.

Nearby shops and restaurants, parks, excellent schools (both private and public), 10 minutes to downtown, this home meets all your needs and more. Make this your forever home.

99-Year Deal Advances Plans for Multi-Use Light Rail Complex

Gerdling plaza

Sound Transit recently agreed to sign Portland-based Gerding Edlen to a 99-year contract to develop the area around the Capitol Hill Transit Link Light rail station, according to Curbed Seattle. The area will be multi-use with a strong community-based approach, including apartment living, Broadway Farmers Market, daycare center, and other smaller businesses. A larger anchor store has yet to be determined.

A large appeal for the complex is easy access to popular areas of Seattle, due to the complex’s location over the new 8-story underground Capitol Hill Transit train station, which opened on March 19th, 2016, and is located at 140 Broadway East. In under 4 minutes, riders are able to reach the University of WA. During rush hour, trains leave the station every 6 minutes, and every 10-15 minutes during non-rush hours. Seattle Central Community College, Group Health Medical Center and other locations are also accessible.

Developer Gerding Edlen plans to move ahead with construction in spring of 2018 and potentially will be completed in late 2019.

Former Value Village Could Become an Open Public Market


Cap Hill MArket 5-18

Legacy Commercial and architecture firm Ankrom Moisan released their plans for the redevelopment of the Kelly Springfield Building (formally a Value Village) to the Pike / Pine Neighborhood Council on Monday.

The project aims to create 65,000 square feet of new office space, which will be split between a proposed three-story addition atop the Kelly Springfield Building, and a new, narrow, five-story building.  This new building will be built directly south of the Kelly Springfield Building on what is now a sunken parking lot.

Due to the Kelly Springfield Building status as a Seattle City Landmarks, Legacy Commercial, and Ankrom Moisan must have all of their plans approved by the city’s Architectural Review Committee.  The committee is instant upon the preservation of the building’s brick façade and also committed maintaining a public, retail ruse on the building’s ground floor.  Taking this into consideration, developers from Legacy Commercial are exploring the possibility of transforming the 12,000-square-foot ground floor into an open, food and retail destination, similar to Melrose Market.

Ankrom Moisan and Legacy will be providing its latest design proposal to the Early Design Guidance Review Board (EDG) on Wednesday, June 8, in the Student Center 210 Multipurpose Room of Seattle University, 1000 E. James Way.

Central Co-op Announces Interest in Upcoming Capitol Hill Station development

A preliminary rendering of the future Broadway development flanking the new Sound Transit stop.

A preliminary rendering of the future Broadway development flanking the new Sound Transit stop.

During its annual owner meeting Sunday evening, Central Co-op announced that is pursuing the anchor tenant space in the Capitol Hill Station’s four-site, mixed-use project that will surround the recently opened transit station. Dan Arnett, the cooperative’s president and CEO believes that Central Co-op is “not only the best option for the site but [that] there’s a cultural link.”

Central Co-op’s upcoming formal proposal for the site pits the co-op against New Seasons, a Portland-based grocer that announced its interest in the location earlier this year. While both stores emphasize regional and organic food, Central Co-op’s workforce is unionized while New Season’s is not.

New Seasons’ interest in the Capitol Hill Site sparked dissent from labor advocacy groups earlier this year. Several groups sent a letter to the Sound Transit board, opposing New Seasons as the anchor tenant for the development. The groups argued that “access to jobs for low-income communities and opportunities for locally serving businesses” should be high priorities for the development project. Sound transit, however, does not involve itself in tenant selection which is being left to Gerding Edlen, the developer of the project.  Gerding Edlen, the developer of the property, confirmed that, in addition to New Seasons, “we have received interest from other potential anchor tenants. We have not determined our anchor tenant yet.”

A potential grocery store is far from the only tenant going into retail spaces. Along with more traditional shops, Gerding Edlen envisions a large “bazar” called “The Market House”, which will include a mix of retailers housed in booths of varying sizes to accommodate start-ups as well as more established retailers.

Local Artist Adds Whimsy To The Neighborhood With New Park

12th Ave 2  You may have noticed a new addition to the corner of 12th Avenue and East James Court in the last few months.

What was once a vacant lot, filled with patchy grass and not much else, has been transformed into a beautiful work of art, thanks to Local artist Ellen Sollod.

Sollod is noted for her imaginative and whimsical artistic contributions all over the city, including a sculpture entitled “Origami Tessellation” prominently located on Mercer Street, and “Lost in Thought”, consisting of three seven-foot diameter mosaic insets placed in the sidewalk at Valley Street and Westlake Avenue, and at Valley Street and Fairview Avenue in South Lake Union.

Her latest contribution to the city’s aesthetic is this thought provoking 7,332-square-foot hardscape park, right here in Capitol Hill. The park, which the artist calls more of a “plaza” than a park in many ways, took about eight months to construct and is a bit more personal to the artist, as it’s located close to her home. “I’ve never lived quite as close to something I’ve done, I feel like I’m more of a guardian than I ever have before.”, she is quoted as saying.

12th ave 3Though it’s been open to the public for months now, a grand opening is set for Thursday, April 14, to coincide with the Capitol Hill Art Walk, and will feature live music by the Garfield High School jazz band trio and folk singer Noami Wachira. In addition to live entertainment, the grand opening will also include food and beverages provided by local favorites Starbucks, Ba Bar and Cherry Street Coffee, and will surely prove to be a lovely community gathering and celebration.



For more information about 12th Avenue Square Park, visit To learn more about Sollod and her work, go to

Harvard / Belmont Landmark District Walking Tour

Harvard_Belmont HIstoric District

Spend Saturday, April 9th peering into the glamorous history of Capitol Hill’s Harvard / Belmont Landmark District. Designated in 1980, the district boasts an inventory of impressive estates as well as numerous smaller, but nevertheless charming, homes.

By the early twentieth century, Capitol Hill’s central location yet pastoral streets were attracting affluent families away from the increasingly commercial Frist Hill, arguably Seattle’s first fashionable neighborhood.  Horace Chapin Henry, the venerable Seattle businessman and founder of the Henry Art Gallery, is credited with commissioning the neighborhood’s first substantial house.  Designed by Bebb & Gould, a prominent Seattle firm responsible for the Seattle Asian Art Museum and the Olympic Hotel, the house was completed in 1901 and featured a five-car garage, a novel amenity for a time when automobiles were just appearing on the city’s streets.  The scale of Henry’s home, which unfortunately was demolished in 1936, set an impressive precedent for other affluent Seattleites commissioning homes in the area.

Characteristic of urban development in the early twentieth century, the homes in the Harvard / Belmont district run the gamete in terms of architectural style.  Among the buildings of primary significance, however, are numerous residences undoubtedly influenced by the English architect Richard Norman Shaw.  While Shaw was essentially an eclectic architect, his projects that held the most influence for American designers  were a series of picturesque country houses that derived from a careful study of sixteenth-century English manorial architecture.  The half-timbering, hanging tiles, projecting gables, massive chimney blocks, and asymmetry of Shaw’s work can be felt throughout the Harvard / Belmont District, but especially in the M. H. Young House, the C. H. Bacon House, the J. A. Kerr House, and the W. L. Rhodes House

Whether you go for the early-twentieth century gossip, the plethora of beautiful and architecturally significant houses, or just for the walk, the important thing is to go, as you will not want to miss this glance into the fascinating history of the Harvard / Belmont Landmark District.


Tours are approximately 2 hours and run rain or shine, dress accordingly! Advance registration is strongly encouraged; walk-ups are limited to space available for a cost of $25 (cash only/exact change required). For more information on SAF tours, visit their FAQ page ( or call 206-667-9184.


First Hill Walking Tour


The historic fireside room at the Sorrento Hotel serves as the final stop on tour.

The historic fireside room at the Sorrento Hotel serves as the final stop on tour.

On Tuesday, March 8th Historic Seattle, publisher of Tradition and Change on Seattle’s First Hill: Propriety, Profanity, Pills, and Preservation in 2014, is offering a walking tour of First Hill.

Directly adjacent to Capitol Hill’s busy Pike and Pine retail corridors, First Hill may seem like little more than a neighborhood of hospitals. At the close of the nineteenth century, however, First Hill was one of Seattle’s first “it” neighborhoods. Offering commanding views of the fledgling city center, as well an abundant supply of fresh water provided by streams and springs, First Hill attracted many of city’s wealthiest residents who built imposing houses in the varied and exotic architectural styles popular at the turn of past century. At the height of its social cache, First Hill boasted approximately 40 stately residences, home to such influential Seattle names as Terry, Minor, Hanford, Burke, Lowman, Frye, Pigott, Malmo, and Denny. To accommodate the influx of moneyed residents, exclusive social clubs, churches, and restaurants were also built.

First Hill’s reputation as a prestigious residential district fell victim to urban growth. During the interwar period, the neighborhood began a quick transition into a largely institutional and commercial district, with Virginia Mason establishing its first foothold in the area in 1920. Today, most of First Hill’s mansions have been demolished, but a few remain, including the Stimson-Green Mansion, now operated by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation (

Tuesday’s walking tour will include the Frye Art Museum, Saint James Cathedral, H.H. Dearborn House, Stimson-Green Mansion, Piedmont Hotel (now Tuscany Apartments), First Baptist Church, Fire Station No. 25, the Sorrento Hotel, among other properties. The tour will provide insight into the development of First Hill and changes the neighborhood has faced over the past century.


Date: March 8th, 2016

Time: 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Venue: Frye Art Museum, 704 Terry Avenue

Tickets: $35 general public / $25 Historic Seattle members

Just Listed! Stunning North Capitol Hill Tudor

954 17th FrontJust listed, this North Capitol Hill home is lovely in so many ways. This stunningly updated and cared for Tudor sits on a pristinely landscaped corner lot, anchored by an 80+-year-old Atlas Cedar. This home checks every box: formal and sophisticated entertaining spots; beautiful and functional eat-in kitchen with attached family room; and chef’s kitchen fully equipped with stainless steel appliances and granite counter tops. This home features beautiful hardwood floors and leaded windows throughout; designer fabric window coverings; and Barbara Barry fixtures.

Hardwoods continue on the upper floor, and a full bath serves three comfortable bedrooms with generous closet space. It is easy to take respite in the master suite with its soft grey walls. A walk-in closet and full bath, adorned in Carrera marble and two pedestal sinks, in keeping with the homes era, complete this grown-up space.

The garden is serene and private. Landscaping by Beers-Withington, it is completely in touch with its environment; the native plantings designed to create a purposeful and tailored effect with a smidge of whimsy. There are three cedar decks: one directly off kitchen/family room for outdoor dining, one tucked privately along the side of the house to escape the heat and nap in a hammock, a third at the lawn’s edge to catch the last rays of sunlight.

For more information or to make an appointment to see this fabulous home, or to learn more about Capitol Hill real estate, please contact the listing agent: Kristine Losh.

The Details

Bedrooms: 4+ | Bathrooms: 4 | 4,050 sq. ft. | Year Built: 1928

Available for $2,100,000

   Bathroom    954 17th Living Room



Heads Up!

On the corner of 24th Ave East and East Galer, the SDOT wants to install a dynamic message board, similar to the giant ones seen on highways.

It’s unclear what information they plan to share on the board,  maybe, tell people about traffic on Montlake?  Nonetheless, it will be big, ugly and out of character for our neighborhood.  You can see photos at the facebook page below.

We are urging neighbors to write to SDOT and the city council.

You can join the FACEBOOK group No DMS on 24th at this link or email if you have any questions, thoughts or insights.

OutWatch Group To Conduct Late-Night Patrols of Capitol Hill Streets

cal anderson

In response to a recent duo of violent attacks in the neighborhood – a rape and an attack on a drag performer – Jennifer Dietrich, who runs Capitol Hill’s Dr. Jen’s House of Beauty, is spearheading the formation a new public safety group called OutWatch, in an effort to make people feel safer walking around Capitol Hill at night.

The patrols, which will will be made up of groups of four, including two people trained in self defense, would operate from about 10:00 p.m. to 3:00 a.m., Thursday through Saturday, and would be available to escort people to their cars or to other safe places. According to an article about the meeting in The Seattle Times, Dietrich said, “Whoever lives and works up here should be able to get from point A to point B without being afraid or without being attacked.”

OutWatch hearkens back to an early-1990s group called Q Patrol, whose members were trained in self defense and patrolled the streets in response to gay-bashing incidents in the neighborhood.