Tips for Spring Sellers!

 

The flowers are starting to bud, and the sun is peaking through the clouds (on some days); Spring is in the air and For Sale signs are emerging around Seattle. How do you stay ahead of the game? As the housing market begins to heat up, sellers can take these extra steps to help stand out among the rest. At first glance, potential buyers are scrutinizing your property before they even step foot in the door, and having a clean entrance and yard can make a big difference for first impressions.  Adding a beautiful potted plant to the front porch, or staining the front deck could be relatively small projects that could add generous appeal to your home.

Staging your home is another great way to entice buyers to choose your home. Hiring professionals to arrange your home to appeal to a broad array of buyers could be the difference between a buyer choosing your home, or choosing one just down the street. Removing personal belongings helps buyers envision themselves living on the property- not you. Also remember to give your home a good cleaning before showings; a clean home feels bigger and more inviting.

For more information on Seattle real estate, contact your local real estate agent today.

Capitol Hill Station Development Update

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Photo by Brandon Marcz, The Capitol Hill Times

On December 6th, a community openhouse was held at 420 E. Pike Street to show ideas and preliminary design proposals for development around the Capitol Hill light rail station. Input from the general public was encouraged. Hosted by Capitol Hill Housing and Gerding Edlen, (the latter is developing the site), members of the design team were on-hand to answer questions.

There appear to a number of goals surrounding the development, mostly having to do with creating a centric, community-based environment which promotes easy accessibility, while incorporating affordable housing in the mix. There are four sites that will be developed around the transit station at 140 Broadway East on Capitol Hill, some with resident-friendly features, such as a daycare center. capitolhillstationsite

Here are a few of the ideas being proposed:

  • a blend of housing and retail, including potentially a restaurant
  • ground-floor daycare center, including an adjoining outside play area
  • large anchor retail store
  • twice-weekly, year-round farmers market on the plaza (adjacent to Cal Anderson Park)
  • great accessability and an easy walk to the transit station
  • 20-100% affordable housing, depending upon the building site, based on average median income
  • “festival street” that would close to vehicles during special events
  • rooftop deck
  • underground parking
  • library amenity on a 2nd floor
  • urban agriculture (they are currently looking for a farming partner)

The Capitol Hill Link Light Rail station links the University of WA to Downtown Seattle on a 3.15 mile-long line, and greatly reduces the normal car commute. The station is located on the surface as well as underground, and was newly opened this year. Construction around the station will begin in the spring of 2018 and last for 18 to 24 months.

Garbage Piling Up? Waste Management Strike Affects King County

Did you notice your garbage was still in the driveway when you came home from work yesterday afternoon? You weren’t the only one! The Waste Management Team in King and Snohomish counties went on strike yesterday afternoon against the largest refuse service over wage and benefits issues in the Northwest. According to the Seattle Times, the Local 117, which includes 153 recycling-route drivers walked out yesterday, and were joined by the garbage truck drivers of Local 174 shortly after.

Drivers began to pull service trucks into the South Seattle Waste Management yard, stepped out of their vehicles and picked up a picket sign. Their strike affects over 220,000 in King and Snohomish counties, and Waste Management could be issued steep fines should the strike drag out; up to $4,500 dollars a day for failing to make scheduled collections, and $250,000 if the strike drags out longer than a week. Drivers have been without a contract since May 31st, and are disputing the wage gap between recycle drivers who start at $17 an hour vs garbage drivers who’re starting at around $26 an hour. At this time there are no plans for negotiation in place, Waste Management hopes drivers will come back to work. For more information on the strike, visit the Seattle Times.