Hammershøi and His Contemporaries Lecture Series Begins August Second

800px-Vilhelm_Hammershoi_-_Interieur_mit_Rueckenansicht_einer_Frau_-_1903-1904_-_Randers_Kunstmuseum

Interior with Young Woman from Behind (1904)

In tandem with the Frye Art Museum’s current exhibition, Chronicles of Solitude: Masterworks by Vilhelm Hammershøi from SMK—The National Gallery of Denmark, the Nordic Heritage Museum and the Frye Art Museum are collaborating on a public lecture series titled Hammershøi and His Contemporaries. Comprised of four lectures, the series examines the four major genres represented in Hammershøi’s oeuvre: portraits, interior spaces, landscapes, and cityscapes.

Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916), whose work was much admired by his contemporaries both in Europe and the United States, is best known for his paintings of sparse, light-filled interiors. Rendered in a strict palette of colors, Hammershøi’s canvases are reminiscent of Dutch Baroque paintings in their handling of light and subject matter. Owing to this mastery, German critic Georg Biermann described Hammershøi in 1909 as a “modern Nordic Vermeer.”

The first lecture in the Hammershøi and His Contemporaries series will be held August Second at 9:30 am in the Frye auditorium.

Cost for series: $110 for NHM and Frye members, $170 general admission

Register Here

Seattle Asian Art Museum Renovation

Seattle Asian Art

Beginning in the spring of 2017, the Seattle Asian Art Museum will close to undertake a major renovation that is slated to cost in the neighborhood of $45 million dollars.  The renovation, which will be the first the museum has undergone since its construction in 1933, will modernize the facility while preserving the integrity of the historic building.

In 1990 the Seattle Art Museum moved from its original building in Volunteer Park to downtown Seattle. The museum’s original building was converted to house the museum’s vast collection of Asian antiquities and opened to the public under the name the Seattle Asian Art Museum in 1994.

The Volunteer Park museum building was designed by architects Carl F. Gould and Charles Bebb in the Art Moderne style and opened to the public in 1933.  As a conscious reaction to Art Deco, with its exuberantly decorative historicism, Art Moderne was optimistically modern. Designers abandoned ornament and instead took inspiration from the smooth surfaces of the machine. With its bold horizontal massing and smooth, limestone facades, the Seattle Asian Art Museum fits well within the canon American Art Moderne architecture and due to this the building was declared a Seattle City Landmark in 201

The first in a series of community feedback sessions is set to occur at the Seattle Asian Art Museum 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, July 16, in the Alvord Board Room, which will include updates on the design process. LMN Architects has been hired on to the project.