Ride The ‘New Wave’ At CoCa’s 24th Annual 24-hour Art Marathon & Auction

This Thursday marks the start of an artistic event unlike any other, The Center On Contemporary Art’s (CoCa)  24th Annual 24-hour Art Marathon and  Auction Gala.

This event is a spectacular three-day contemporary art extravaganza, in which over 20 local artists will draw, collage, paint, spray, wax, photograph, cut and sculpt to create over 100 new works of original art, before their freshly minted works are auctioned off at this year’s gala and auction.

The celebration begins on Thursday, November 10th at 10 AM, when the artists will converge on the Summit Building in Seattle (420 E Pike St) and begin their 24-hour long journey of creating new and inspired works of art. The public is invited to view the marvelous display of imagination and controlled chaos during the marathon.

On the evening of November 10th, join the ongoing bedlam at the Art Party from 6-9 PM, happening during the Capitol Hill Art Walk. Grab a sneak peek of the art in progress and the meet the artists, in motion, no less!  Admission is by donation to the art party.
The spectacle culminates on Saturday, November 12th with the Auction Gala. To celebrate CoCa’s 35th anniversary, the theme of this years’ gala is taking it all the way back to the year CoCa debuted on the Seattle arts scene, 1981, with a fun and funky New Wave theme, dubbing it the New Wave Ball. Guests are encouraged to glam it up for this event, in true 80’s style. So, bust out those studded cuffs, rubber bracelets and neon everything! (Bonus points if you dare to rock a A Flock Of Seagulls haircut!)

Doors open at 5:30 PM for the ever popular silent and live auction portion of the evening, with renowned auctioneer and MC, Laura Michalek at the helm, for what is sure to be a fabulous time.

While deciding how to place your bids, sip on complimentary local beverages provided by Elysian Brewing and Columbia Winery, or skip straight to the hard stuff at the cash bar, featuring Sparkle Donkey Tequila from Seattle’s own Black Rock Spirits.

Gala guests will then be treated to a delectable sit down dinner, provided by Underwood Stables and New Roots Organics, before heading out to the dance floor to cut a rug to the sweet new wave beats played by DJ Jesse Milden.

CoCa gathered an extraordinary group of artists to participate in this event, including, Leslie West, Crystal Barbre, Zeynep Banu Aley, CASH, Juli Adams, Casey Curran, Jessica Dodge, Julie Devine, Galvanic Games, Aaron Haba, Gabriel Marquez, Braden Duncan, Kemba Opio, Kyle Rees, Junko Yamamoto, Erika Rier, Sara Takako-Skinner, Casey Weldon, Mackenzie Stratton, Robin Walker, Hanna Myers, and Daniel John Williams.

CoCa’s main mission is to support and encourage the creation of contemporary art and gives 50% of the auction proceeds back to these artists. Your bid makes a big difference to these artists and the art community, so bid high and help them thrive!

If you’re passionate about art or just curious to see what’s happening in the local arts scene, this event is just your style! See how the art you love is made, meet the artists, and maybe even take it home, all the while supporting the local art community and the people who use their talents to make it fantastic!

 

Details-

November 10th and 12th, 2016

CoCA 24-hour Art Marathon Artist Preview Party
November 10, 2016, 6:00pm

CoCA New Wave Ball & Auction
November 12, 2016, 5:30pm

Location: Summit Building 420 E. Pike Street

Get your tickets here and more information here

Capitol Hill Real Estate Report – October 2016

capitol hill real estateAs with the rest of Seattle, Capitol Hill real estate continues to perform well.  In October of this year, there were 13 Capitol Hill homes sold for an average of $926,000 and 28 Capitol Hill condos for an average of just over $446,000.  The highest price in October was $1,500,000 for a home on 16th and Republican and $1,150,000 for a condominium on the 700 block of Belmont Ave.

The Central Seattle area (between I-90 and the Montlake cut and I-5 and Lake Washington) saw the average price of homes up from October 2015 of $882,720 to $990,258 in October 2016 while condos rose from $507,567 last October to $593,872 in October this year.  The number of sales of area’s homes decreased from 83 in October last year to 64 this year, whereas the number of condos sold rose from 52 to 79.

While prices of real estate on Capitol Hill and in Central Seattle are significant, they are still dwarfed by other local areas.  For example, the average price on Mercer Island this October was just under $1.5 million and the Bellevue area west of 405 was nearly $2 million.

North Capitol Hill Home New to the Market!

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This quintessential North Capitol Hill Tudor sits privately above the street on coveted 22nd Avenue East, one of Seattle’s finest blocks. Generosity and flow of space are the key elements making this home both luxurious and functional.

The expansive but private front porch is a room of its own–a great spot for breakfast or an evening read. The large, sun-filled living room boasts classic Tudor-style details: original stained glass and leaded windows, beamed ceilings, and a wood burning fireplace framed by a substantial mantel and built-ins. Off the living room is a cozy study with a gas fireplace.

Perfect for entertaining, the spacious dining room is conveniently open to the living area, kitchen, and breakfast room. The chef’s kitchen is well equipped with a commercial range combo–6 burner gas cooktop, double oven, broiler, and griddle–plus ample counter and storage space, counter eating, and a cook’s desk. Just off the kitchen and breakfast room, a decked garden space is lush with mature shrubs, trees, and vines.

The 2nd level features the bright and spacious master suite with walk-in closet, finished sunporch, and full bath; two more bedrooms, one with in-suite bathroom; a stately office with gas fireplace; a 3rd full bath; and hall closet space.

The 3rd level is complete with two large bedrooms, both with a pair of built-in single beds; a full bathroom; craft/work room; large storage room; and another large closet. In keeping with this home’s spacious overall feel, the basement level hosts a sizeable recreation room warmed by a wood burning fireplace; a huge, open laundry area with laundry chute and closet; and, of course, plenty of additional storage space.

Nearby shops and restaurants, parks, excellent schools (both private and public), 10 minutes to downtown, this home meets all your needs and more. Make this your forever home.

99-Year Deal Advances Plans for Multi-Use Light Rail Complex

Gerdling plaza

Sound Transit recently agreed to sign Portland-based Gerding Edlen to a 99-year contract to develop the area around the Capitol Hill Transit Link Light rail station, according to Curbed Seattle. The area will be multi-use with a strong community-based approach, including apartment living, Broadway Farmers Market, daycare center, and other smaller businesses. A larger anchor store has yet to be determined.

A large appeal for the complex is easy access to popular areas of Seattle, due to the complex’s location over the new 8-story underground Capitol Hill Transit train station, which opened on March 19th, 2016, and is located at 140 Broadway East. In under 4 minutes, riders are able to reach the University of WA. During rush hour, trains leave the station every 6 minutes, and every 10-15 minutes during non-rush hours. Seattle Central Community College, Group Health Medical Center and other locations are also accessible.

Developer Gerding Edlen plans to move ahead with construction in spring of 2018 and potentially will be completed in late 2019.

Hammershøi and His Contemporaries Lecture Series Begins August Second

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Interior with Young Woman from Behind (1904)

In tandem with the Frye Art Museum’s current exhibition, Chronicles of Solitude: Masterworks by Vilhelm Hammershøi from SMK—The National Gallery of Denmark, the Nordic Heritage Museum and the Frye Art Museum are collaborating on a public lecture series titled Hammershøi and His Contemporaries. Comprised of four lectures, the series examines the four major genres represented in Hammershøi’s oeuvre: portraits, interior spaces, landscapes, and cityscapes.

Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916), whose work was much admired by his contemporaries both in Europe and the United States, is best known for his paintings of sparse, light-filled interiors. Rendered in a strict palette of colors, Hammershøi’s canvases are reminiscent of Dutch Baroque paintings in their handling of light and subject matter. Owing to this mastery, German critic Georg Biermann described Hammershøi in 1909 as a “modern Nordic Vermeer.”

The first lecture in the Hammershøi and His Contemporaries series will be held August Second at 9:30 am in the Frye auditorium.

Cost for series: $110 for NHM and Frye members, $170 general admission

Register Here

Seattle Asian Art Museum Renovation

Seattle Asian Art

Beginning in the spring of 2017, the Seattle Asian Art Museum will close to undertake a major renovation that is slated to cost in the neighborhood of $45 million dollars.  The renovation, which will be the first the museum has undergone since its construction in 1933, will modernize the facility while preserving the integrity of the historic building.

In 1990 the Seattle Art Museum moved from its original building in Volunteer Park to downtown Seattle. The museum’s original building was converted to house the museum’s vast collection of Asian antiquities and opened to the public under the name the Seattle Asian Art Museum in 1994.

The Volunteer Park museum building was designed by architects Carl F. Gould and Charles Bebb in the Art Moderne style and opened to the public in 1933.  As a conscious reaction to Art Deco, with its exuberantly decorative historicism, Art Moderne was optimistically modern. Designers abandoned ornament and instead took inspiration from the smooth surfaces of the machine. With its bold horizontal massing and smooth, limestone facades, the Seattle Asian Art Museum fits well within the canon American Art Moderne architecture and due to this the building was declared a Seattle City Landmark in 201

The first in a series of community feedback sessions is set to occur at the Seattle Asian Art Museum 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, July 16, in the Alvord Board Room, which will include updates on the design process. LMN Architects has been hired on to the project.

Capitol Hill Real Estate: May Report

Capitol Hill is one of the most popular neighborhoods in Seattle. The real estate is always booming in the area. Last month there with fifty sales, 37 of them being condos. There are currently 48 active listings and 82 pending. The lowest year-to-date sales price is up from $141,000 to $203,000 and the average year-to-date sales price is up from $567,000 to $609,350.

For similar information on Denny BlaineMadison Park, or Madrona real estate please click the previous links to each of these Seattle neighborhoods.

Capitol Hill is a part of “Central Seattle” as defined my Seattle real estate agents. Central Seattle real estate basically includes the area from the Montlake cut to I-90 and from Lake Washington to I-5.  The start of the year shows home prices are up across the city and sales for the first two months are down with 165 sold in 2015 versus 158 in 2016.  Currently, in this central Seattle area, there are 177 active listings.

If you have any questions about the Seattle real estate market, please feel free to reach out to a local Seattle real estate agent.

Grand Re-Opening of Washington Hall

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To celebrate the completion of its ambitious five-year renovation, Washington Hall is holding a grand re-opening on Wednesday, June 1st from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm. Hosted by Historic Seattle, 206 Zulu, Hidmo, and Voices Rising, the Voices Rising, the event will feature music and lite refreshments provided by Madres Kitchen and Panera.

Washington Hall was commissioned by the Danish Brotherhood and opened its doors in 1908.  Designed by Victor Voorhees, Washington Hall was built to provide boarding facilities for newly arrived Danish immigrants and also as a community center, fraternal lodge, and dance hall. Most notably, however, Washington Hall has served as a popular performing arts venue, hosting musicians and speakers such as Marian Anderson, Mahalia Jackson, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie, Jimi Hendrix, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Joe Louis.

Despite being in constant use since its construction, Washington Hall faced demolition due to its deteriorating condition.  In 2009, Historic Seattle, with the aid of 4Culture, purchased the building with the intention to restore it.  The restoration and stabilization work to Washington Hall included seismic upgrades, a new roof, and securing the south wall.  An elevator was added, making the building fully ADA accessible. Refinished floors, stage enhancements, new lighting, and a complete re-working of the back space of the building, all helped to restore this Historic Landmark building in a way that honors its storied past.

 

For more information about his event, visit Washington Hall’s Facebook page.

Former Value Village Could Become an Open Public Market

 

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Legacy Commercial and architecture firm Ankrom Moisan released their plans for the redevelopment of the Kelly Springfield Building (formally a Value Village) to the Pike / Pine Neighborhood Council on Monday.

The project aims to create 65,000 square feet of new office space, which will be split between a proposed three-story addition atop the Kelly Springfield Building, and a new, narrow, five-story building.  This new building will be built directly south of the Kelly Springfield Building on what is now a sunken parking lot.

Due to the Kelly Springfield Building status as a Seattle City Landmarks, Legacy Commercial, and Ankrom Moisan must have all of their plans approved by the city’s Architectural Review Committee.  The committee is instant upon the preservation of the building’s brick façade and also committed maintaining a public, retail ruse on the building’s ground floor.  Taking this into consideration, developers from Legacy Commercial are exploring the possibility of transforming the 12,000-square-foot ground floor into an open, food and retail destination, similar to Melrose Market.

Ankrom Moisan and Legacy will be providing its latest design proposal to the Early Design Guidance Review Board (EDG) on Wednesday, June 8, in the Student Center 210 Multipurpose Room of Seattle University, 1000 E. James Way.

Charette to Draw Public Input for Big Lid

 Marchers against I-5 construction, downtown Seattle, June 1, 1961 Museum of History & Industry


Marchers against I-5 construction, downtown Seattle, June 1, 1961
Museum of History & Industry

In 1967, the last phase of Interstate 5 opened. The freeway, which was designed to link Vancouver, Olympia, Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Bellingham, demolished anything that fell within its path and nowhere was this more destructive than in Seattle. Rather than cut through downtown, or climb through the hills and ridges directly surrounding the city, planners selected a course of least resistance for 1-5 in Seattle. In 1957, more than seven blocks of residences and retail businesses on the east side of Eastlake were razed to make way for the Interstate. The freeway eliminated the bottom portion of the Republican Street Hillclimb, a stairway leading from Cascade to Capitol Hill built in 1910. South of the Ship Canal Bridge Interstate 5 separates the Eastlake and Cascade neighborhoods from the Capitol Hill neighborhood and separates Downtown Seattle from the Capitol Hill and First Hill neighborhoods. Its construction necessitated the demolition of significantly developed areas and cut off walking commutes to downtown for many First Hill and Capitol Hill residents.
Since its completion, there has been significant interest in placing a lid over the portion of I-5 that cuts through Seattle. An early attempt at this can be seen in Lawrence Halprin‘s Freeway Park, which opened in 1976. This Saturday, May 7th, a design charrette (a collaborative session where designers and stakeholders work to draft proposals to solve a design problem) is being held by the Pike/Pine Urban Neighborhood Council to gather ideas that could materialize into an actual lid.
The charrette will take place at 12th Ave Arts this Saturday, May 7th, from 8 AM to 1 PM (coffee and High 5 Pie provided). Attendees will be armed with markers and tracing paper over a blown up image of the I-5 corridor to draw up their best ideas for a lid. Organizers have also compiled packets of materials reviewing existing lids in Seattle and around the U.S.
Pine Street Group developers will next go before the Seattle Design Commission on June 7th, where public benefits for the WSCC addition will be discussed. Commissioners are not expected to take any action. However, the commission will consider materials submitted by the community ahead of the meeting, creating an ideal opportunity to present the results of Saturday’s charrette.