Historical Ghost Tour Of Capitol Hill Tomorrow 10/18!

DCF 1.0Get yourself in the Halloween spirit and learn about the spooky side of Capitol Hill on the 9th annual Capitol Hill Historical Ghost Tour, tomorrow October 18. This is first of three tours (Saturday, October 25, and Friday, October 31 are the other two dates), and begins at Elliott Bay Books at 5:00 p.m.

For approximately an hour and a half, you’ll take a guided walking tour of the Pike/Pine area and head up Broadway, ending at the Harvard Exit Theatre, which is considered one of the most haunted theaters in the Northwest. Hear spooky stories of famous Seattle residents (and their ghosts), including Bruce Lee and Jimi Hendrix.

There is a suggested $5 donation, and tour organizers recommend calling ahead to make sure there is room, especially for large groups (206-523-6348).

Halloween Pub Crawl On 15th Next Saturday 10/25!

15th Ave Pub CrawlThink of next Saturday’s 1st Annual 15th Avenue Halloween Pub Crawl as trick-or-treating for grown ups, except instead of candy you’ll be collecting delicious beers and prizes at bars and restaurants up and down 15th.

Put on your costume and start the night off at Smith at 5:00 p.m. After that, the crawl will move every 45 minutes, starting with Coastal Kitchen (don’t forget to eat a few oysters…or a dozen), followed by stops at the Hopvine, Liberty, Harry’s Bar/Olympia Pizza, and the Canterbury. The person with the best costume will get a special prize, so make sure to stick around until the end!

Seattle Police Report on Interlaken Attack

policeIf you have not heard there was an attack last Thursday in broad daylight on a woman jogger on the section of Interlaken that is closed to traffic.  The news has shocked Capitol Hill residents as well as others in Seattle.  The first reports did not give a huge amount of information on the motive of the attack and unfortunately there are still unanswered questions.  Here is the police report:

15 INITIAL INCIDENT DESCRIPTION / NARRATIVE:     {On 10/9/2014 I responded to an assault at Interlaken Park.  I arrived and contacted V/ at 21 Ave E & E Interlaken Blvd.  stated she was jogging on the roadway that runs through Interlake Park. The roadway is closed of to vehicular traffic.   was jogging eastbound through the park when an unknown black male attacked her from behind.  The suspect grabbed  in a carotid choke hold from behind.  struggled with the suspect and they both fell to the ground.  continued to struggle.   and the suspect rolled down an embankment. was still in the suspect chokehold and went unconscious. said she was unconscious for a few seconds.  regained consciousness and the suspect was gone.   climbed up the embankment to the roadway.  observed a black male walking very fast westbound on the SEATTLE POLICE DEPARTMENT GENERAL OFFENSE HARDCOPY WEB RELEASE – SOME REDACTIONS PER RCW 42.56.240 GO# 2014-338190 INACTIVE 1306-0 ASSLT-AGG-BODYFORCE For: 5306      Printed On: Oct-13-2014  (Mon.) Page 4 of 5 roadway.  believed it was the suspect that choked her out. described the suspect and a black male, 5’10″ tall, medium muscular build, wearing an maroon hooded sweatshirt and blue jeans. also stated there was a black male standing on the other side of the roadway starring at her.   did not know if the second person was involved in the attack.  described the second person and a light skin black male, 5’8′ tall, thin build wearing a orange hooded sweatshirt.   ran westbound on the roadway yelling for assistance. came to the corner of 21st Av E & Interlaken Blvd, flagged down a passerby and used his cell phone to call 911.                said the suspect did not make any statements during the attack. did not know the suspects motivation.   did not have any property on her person at the time of the attack.  I asked  if she thought the attack had a sexual motivated.  said she did not think it was sexual.  had punched and grabbed the suspect’s genitalia during the altercation.  said the suspect did not appear to be sexually aroused.  clothing was intact.  skin and clothing was soiled with dirt from the struggle.   had no visible signs of injury.  I requested SFD respond to the scene.  SFD E6 responded and rendered aid to                Officer Laina, Officer Williams and Officer Bolton checked the area for the suspect(s) with negative results.   took me to the area the assault occurred.  could not pinpoint the exact area but she was able to point out the general location. I scoured the area for evidence.  I found nothing in the area of evidentiary value.               Sgt Visaya responded to the scene.               I gave  my business card with SPD case number and SFD run Officer Bolton transported  to her residence. –>} I hereby declare (certify) under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of Washington that this report is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief (RCW 9A.72.085) Electronically signed: KNOX, KURT E         Date: Oct-09-2014       Place: Seattle, WA

Capitol Hill Real Estate: Steady as She Goes

Capitol Hill SeattleCapitol Hill Real Estate is pretty steady as compared to last year.  This July there was 51 sales, the average days on market for a Capitol Hill property was 35 days, and the average sales price was just over $500,000.  Comparing this to last July there was 57 sales, the average was 32 days on market, and the average sales price was slightly over $525,000.  All the numbers are very similar to the previous year.  For example, the above pictured North Capitol Hill home sold twice in the past year and half.  Both times the home sold for essentially the same price indicating the market has been relatively steady over that time.

Capitol Hill real estate market has a small sample size so the statistics have to be tempered because a few sales can make a huge difference.  Looking at both residential and condo sales in the Central Seattle real estate market (east of I-5 to the lake; south of the Montlake Cut to I-90) the number of sales increased (last July 146 sales vs 153 sales this July) but the average sales price decreased slightly from $650,977 to $644,454.

While numbers were gathered from the Northwest Multiple listing Service; Statistics not compiled or published by the Northwest Multiple Listing Service.

Feel free to contact me if you want a complimentary price opinion of your home:  Kristine Losh, Ewing & Clark Real Estate.

SDOT Wants Your Input On The Central Area Greenway Project

greenwayAs one of the main arterials for car traffic that runs the length of the eastern edge of Capitol Hill and through the Central District, 23rd Avenue is not the most welcoming street for pedestrians or cyclists. But the Seattle Department of Transportation is hoping to give residents and commuters a calmer, safer north-south route by creating a greenway parallel to 23rd that will stretch from Roanoke Park at the north end to Rainier Avenue at the south end. The 23rd Avenue Corridor Improvements Project will bring a redesign of the street, but it will not include a dedicated bike lane, so the greenway will provide a much-needed lower speed limit alternative to the heavily trafficked 23rd. The final route will most likely follow both 21st and 25th avenues, and could include features such as new pavement markings; improved pedestrian and cyclist crossings; new signage; and traffic features such as flashing beacons, islands and speed bumps.

The project is being carried out in three phases, with phase 1 covering East John to South Jackson, phase 2 covering South Jackson to Rainier Avenue South, and phase 3 covering East Roanoke to East John. The design for phase 1 has been finalized, but SDOT is looking for neighbors’ input on the proposed routes for phases 2 and 3, and is hosting two drop-in planning sessions next week. The session for phase 2 will be held on Tuesday, July 15 at the St. Mary’s Church school house (611 20th Ave. S) from 4:30-7:00 p.m., and the session for phase 3 will take place on Thursday, July 17 at Miller Community Center (330 19th Ave. E) from 4:00-6:30 p.m.

There are six existing greenways in the city, six more set for implementation in 2014, and eight in the planning stages that will add up to 17.9 miles toward the city’s ultimate goal of 250 miles of connected greenways. When it is complete, the 23rd Avenue greenway will be one of the longest in the city at 3.9 miles. Visit the Seattle greenways site for more info on all of the projects, and don’t forget to attend one or both of the meetings next week to give SDOT your feedback!

 

A Look Back On the Installation of the Black Sun

Have you ever wondered what the story is behind that big black sculpture in Volunteer Park? The Black Sun sculpture, (not to be confused with the Changing Form steel sculpture in Kerry Park) has often been the centerpiece for iconic Seattle photography, as the view from the sculpture overlooks the Space Needle, the Olympics, Elliott Bay and beyond. It’s inspired generations of onlookers, including Seattle’s own Sound Garden, (remember Black Hole Sun, won’t you come, won’t you come?). But did you know it’s been displayed in the neighborhood since 1969? Internationally renowned artist Isamu Noguchi had a vision to create a fluid and timelessly constructed piece that would appear to move as the sun does, creating a steadfast relationship between the actual sun, and the artwork itself.

Courtesy of the City of Seattle Archives, Installation circa 1969

Courtesy of the City of Seattle Archives, Installation circa 1969

Black Sun was a gift donated to the City of Seattle from the Seattle Foundation, with funding support from National Endowment for the Arts. Noguchi etched the stone to capture the organic forms found in nature, and the sculpture is made out of Brazilian granite form materials, measuring 9ft in diameter. Installation took place in 1969, and has been drawing crowds of tourists and locals alike ever since. If you haven’t been to the park in a while, take advantage of this beautiful weather and snap a shot of the skyline through the hole of the sculpture, or put your headphones in and zone out with Chris Cornell.

Sneak Peek Of The New Canterbury Space

There’s a rumor floating around that the reincarnation of the Canterbury Ale House will at long last be opening tomorrow (check their Facebook page for the official word), but in the meantime check out these photos we took at last night’s soft opening. Although the space retains its medieval influence with the inclusion of lots of wood and metalwork; murals featuring dueling knights; and a stained glass window depicting a sword and shield, it bears little resemblance (in a good way, we think) to Ye Canterbury of Olde.

canterbury 1

The medieval theme continues with decorative murals.

Ceilings have been raised creating a much more open feel.

Ceilings have been raised creating a much more open feel.

canterbury 3

A stained glass window

canterbury 4

Another view of the bar area and very medieval-looking chandelier.

A look at the seating.

Seating and wood paneling.

Join In The ‘Clean Sweep’ Of Capitol Hill This Sunday

clean

Your homes aren’t the only places that need spring cleaning, and this Sunday, June 7 you can help get the sidewalks and green spaces of Capitol Hill in tip-top shape for the year ahead by joining the Capitol Hill Chamber of Commerce in its annual Clean Sweep event.

The event, which started as an effort by a few neighbors to clean up Broadway, has grown into an effort that now boasts more than 400 volunteers and has been able to spruce up 23 blocks of Capitol Hill. All ages are invited to come and help out, and in addition to providing much-needed deep cleaning in the neighborhood, the event also provides residents and business owners a chance to connect and work together for a common cause. All cleaning supplies will be provided, as well as breakfast from Starbucks, lunch from local Capitol Hill restaurants, and a t-shirt for each volunteer. Meet at the Cal Anderson Park shelterhouse at 10:00 a.m. to get your breakfast and begin cleaning! Register for the event here.

A new feature of the event this year is the Shred-it! e-waste recycling drop off and paper shredding station in the Richard Hugo House parking lot, where people can bring up to 10 bags of paper for shredding and up to 10 electronic devices (TV’s, CPU’s, computer monitors, laptops, cell phones) to be safely recycled for free. The Shred-it! event is being held by 1st Security Bank and you can find a full list of what can and can’t be recycled on their website.

 

 

 

 

North Capitol Hill Craftsman Home: $685,000

cap hill blog home

This lovely 4 bed, 2.25 bath North Capitol Hill Craftsman home is now available! Features of the home include beamed ceilings, oak flooring, wainscot paneling, large windows, cheerful garden, covered porch and an upper deck. The home is located in close proximity to shops, restaurants, Volunteer Park, schools and also a short distance to the University of Washington, downtown Seattle and freeway access. The home is currently leased through February 2015, if you are interested in this or other Capitol Hill neighborhood homes, contact your local real estate agent today!

Status: For Sale
Bed/Bath: 4/2.25
Price: $685,000

Projected May Opening For Revived Canterbury Ale & Eats

canterbury

The restaurant and bar scene on 15th Avenue East isn’t exactly lacking, what with Ethan Stowell’s continued domination (Rione XIII, Anchovies & Olives, Bar Cotto) and Linda Derschang’s stalwart Smith, but for the last few months it has lacked a certain…medieval-ness. CHS reports that The Hill’s much loved Chaucer-inspired Canterbury Ale & Eats, which occupied its spot at 15th and Mercer for 37 years before closing late last year, is on the verge of reopening under new owners Mike Meckling and James Snyder as a considerably less dive-y iteration of its former self.

The medieval theme will stay, in the form of chain mail screens, dark English pub-style wood, a recently uncovered Canterbury Tales mural, and yes, the resident suit of armor, but the space will be completely opened up and will feature a brand new 30-foot-long bar, 30 taps, new seating areas and most notably, a new chef and menu. Cormac Mahoney, former head chef at the recently closed Madison Park Conservatory, will serve as new head chef, and according to Eater his menu will consist of elevated versions of traditional English pub food, including fried rockfish and chips, Canterbury bangers, deep fried cheese curds, French onion gratin, and steak tartar with bone marrow tots – a far cry from the fries and chicken strips that graced the previous menu.

This will not be the Canterbury of days of yore, but we are glad to see it given new life and continue to occupy its spot on 15th. Its projected public opening date is May 30, but check its Facebook page for the most up to date opening info!