Capitol Hill Real Estate Report – July 2017

 

Past Sold Listing in Capitol Hill

Just like Seattle’s weather the real estate market in Capitol Hill continues to stay hot. There were 23 single-family homes sold last month and 38 condos. The average list price for a single-family home climbed from $975,595 (7/2016) to $1,052,900 (7/2017). The highest cost for a home jumped from $1,925,000 (2016) to $2,550,000 (2017), the lowest as also spiked from $500,000 to $645,000. There are currently 17 active listings and 24 pending.

Past Sold Listing in Capitol Hill

Condos have also shown growth in the Capitol Hill, Seattle area. The average list price for a condo in the Capitol Hill neighborhood has jumped from $432,094 in July of 2016 to $533,034 this past month (July 2017). The highest sold price was $3,050,000, $1.45 million more than July 2016. The median price for a condo has gone up from $392,000 to $510,000. There are currently 12 active listing and 34 pending.

 

The Greenest Commercial Building on Earth

The Bullitt Center, the world’s only fully self-sustained office building.  Photo: Joe Mabel

To be called the world’s greenest office building is no easy feat, but the 6-story Bullitt Center at 1501 East Madison Street between Capitol Hill and the Central District has attained that status. Completed in 2013, it has won numerous environmental awards and received much media coverage since then, due to being completely self-sustaining, like a forest, thus not contributing to global warming. It’s considered a “Living Building”, mimicking how nature reuses, stores, and filters materials in a productive way. The Bullitt Center was built to last 250 years, and is so effective at generating energy that it has an excess during the summer months.

Created as part of the Living Building Challenge, this building produces its own energy through solar panels on the roof, processing its own rainwater for reuse, composting toilets, a bike garage + showers, rare triple-pane windows, completely non-toxic and locally-sourced building materials, automatic blinds adjustment according to sun position, heat pumps processing at 400 feet below the soil, and lots of natural light and wood throughout. The building is purposely situated near various public transit and has the best walking score possible: 100 out of 100. Tenants are given an energy allotment according to how much space (ranging from 2,000 to 8,000 square feet) they occupy in the building. If they stay within those parameters, they receive a financial incentive at the end of the year.

Denis Hayes, who has an incredible environmental resume (including being the organizer for the very first Earth Day in the 1970s, then bringing it to the global stage) is now president of the Bullitt Foundation, which owns the building. In critical upcoming years, as urban populations continue to grow, Hayes hopes that the Bullitt Center will serve as an example of what’s possible, and will promote future construction of other living, sustainable buildings.

Photo: Joe Mabel

Lineup and Advice for the Capitol Hill Block Party This Weekend

On this year’s direction …

“I think this year covers a pretty broad spectrum of the stuff we’ve always worked with. Obviously Diplo would fall into the more electronic EDM category. Obviously, Run the Jewels are more hip-hop and certainly politically relevant, right now especially. And then Friday, like Lord Huron, or Saturday sorry, they cover more of that sort of folk category. We worked with all those bands, again, for years. I think we’ve been fairly consistent with our programming, over the years. Some years might lean a little more a certain way than others, but that’s not always by complete design. There’s a lot of variables.”

On booking the big bands …

“We have a wish list. We sort of put together bands that we’re really into, that we love, that we’d love to see come participate. I mean we’re talking to agents sometimes as early as now about next year. Just the way festivals have become such a key part of musicians’ income, you know, people are planning their festival stuff a year out …

On watching smaller bands evolve …

“I think we invest in bands from when they’re doing very small shows … Honestly 60-70 percent is local, regional artists that we work with, often for years, throughout their careers. And so get to kind of build together. It’s always exciting for us when we get to see bands go from that first show at Barboza to headlining Neumos to coming and playing the mainstage at the festival. And in cases like Odesza, headlining the festival.”

On bands he’s excited about …

“I mean Run the Jewels is a really exciting artist to have. Not only am I excited about their music, I’m excited about their politics. And I think it’s going to be a great show. Angel Olsen. I really loved that last record. And I’m really excited to see how this tour is and see how her band’s developed since we had her several years ago. Wolf Parade. A band that I’ve loved. I’m probably showing my age here but … that was a band that was relevant during the early parts of my career — midcareer, I guess, in the early 2000s. And they’re also Canadian so that’s awesome. So close to my heart there. I also really love Perfume Genius, some of the stuff that I’ve heard from his new record, I really dig. And Austra is also an artist that I have a long, I guess personal history … I really loved that first record and I remember seeing her at South by [Southwest] the year that came out.”

On advice for festivalgoers …

“Stay hydrated. Check out all the bars and restaurants that are there … And don’t bring a car.”

Lajeunesse makes some comparisons of his own …

“It’s kind of a stretch, but I think there’s some really amazing arena anthems.”

If you like … Dan Auerbach (of The Black Keys), try My Goodness

“I think there’s some parallels there.”

 

Syndicated from The Seattle Times. Featured photo source: Capitolhillseattle.com

Capitol Hill Block Party 2017 Survival Guide

Ready your pump-up playlist and finalize your stage-hopping itinerary, because Capitol Hill’s favorite neighborhood music festival returns from July 21 to 23! The 21st annual Capitol Hill Block Party will span 6 blocks, 5 stages, 3 days, and will feature sets from more than 100 artists.

Approaching the weekend with a plan of action is the best way to get the most bang for your buck. So round up your fellow festival-goers, dust off your dancing shoes, and prepare to take some notes!

Know before you go

First things first: if you don’t already have your ticket, purchase it now to get in on the action before potentially getting bumped with the dreaded “sold out” message. Ticket options include the following:

  • 3-day pass ($150 for general admission or $300 for VIP)
  • 2-day pass (select your preferred combination of days for $110)
  • Single day pass (select Friday, Saturday, or Sunday for $60)

Ticket acquired? Have it with you when gates open at 3 p.m. on Friday and at 1 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Shows run all day and into late evening, and performance times vary by stage and artist. The Main Stage and Vera Stage, both located outdoors, are each open to all ages, while the Neumos, Barboza, and Cha Cha Stages are exclusively 21 and over. Though attendees are encouraged to explore a variety of shows and discover new favorites, for starters, let’s review some of the standout Main Stage headliners to guide you along as you decide which shows to attend:

Friday:

Thundercat | 6:30 – 7:15
You’ve got to see the bass guitar wizard live and in-person to understand just how deep the funk runs. Thundercat is currently touring in support of his third and latest album, “Drunk.”

Wolf Parade | 9:15 – 10:15
The early 2000s Canadian indie rockers are back in the game after a 5-year hiatus. Witness the reunion for yourself at the Main Stage.

Run the Jewels | 10:45 – midnight
El-P and Killer Mike are truly a duo to be reckoned with. Get pumped with some late-night hip-hop from the pair that has brought you three full-length albums and a gift like no other: “Meow the Jewels,” the fantastically feline remix.

Saturday:

Manatee Commune | 4:45 – 5:30
Bellingham’s own Grant Eadie has been killing the festival game this year, and continues the streak onward and upward from Sasquatch. If you’re not already familiar with his up-and-coming electronic-chillwave sounds, seize this opportunity.

Whitney | 6 – 7
Led by former Smith Westerns guitarist and Unknown Mortal Orchestra drummer, Whitney’s debut “Light Upon the Lake” remains the perfect summer soundtrack.

Lord Huron | 10:30 – midnight
Upbeat indie folk meets the summer evening air on the Main Stage.

Sunday:

Cloud Nothings | 3:45 – 4:30
Post-punk noise pop sparks up an afternoon party atmosphere.

Angel Olsen | 8 – 9
Angel’s angelic chops make everything from her folksy singer-songwriter reflections to her crooner-rocker anthems a joy to experience from below the stage.

Diplo | 9:45 – 11
Close out a killer weekend with electronic beats from Diplo himself.

Don’t miss out on your personal must-see shows — check out the complete CHBP lineup and schedule.

Finally, get up to speed with these bite-sized vitals:

  • Restrooms: Other than limited capacity restrooms located at some indoor venues, be prepared to use a porta potty (and to stand in potential bathroom lines).
  • Pets: Leave them safe and sound at home.
  • Transportation: Avoid the inevitable parking nightmare — leave your personal car behind and carry change to hop a city bus, use a Car2Go to access the convenient onsite CHBP drop-off zone, call a Lyft or Uber (but be prepared for possible surge pricing), or just walk to the entrance points at 12th and Pike or 10th and Pine. Bikes will not be allowed on festival grounds.
  • Weather: The event will take place rain or shine. At the time of publication, the current projected Seattle weather forecast calls for temperatures in the low- to mid-70s, light winds, clouds with a 20% chance of rain on Friday, and sunshine with a 10% chance of rain on Saturday and Sunday.
  • Restricted items: Review the list of what you can and cannot bring into the festival (bags will be checked upon entry).

Enjoy yourself on festival weekend

Ensure you have the best time possible. Start with these five basic tips.

1. Stay hydrated

Should you become dehydrated, you’re gonna have a bad time. Dehydration is especially accelerated in the heat and sun, and since Block Party is a largely outdoor summer event, remaining hydrated is going to require some vigilance. While glass and full, unsealed bottles cannot be brought into the festival, bring an empty reusable water bottle (you can fill it inside the festival) or an unopened, safety-sealed water bottle (which you can also refill on festival grounds once you finish its contents… and recycle should you no longer need it). The key is to continue hydrating throughout the day and evening — especially if you plan on drinking (alcohol is dehydrating), dancing (dehydrating), or otherwise enjoying yourself (moral of the story: you’re gonna want to hydrate no matter what).

2. Don’t party on an empty stomach

Drinking on an empty stomach is not only unsafe — it’s also a nearly surefire way to end up with a hangover and hinder your Block Party experience (or worse, confine you to bedrest at home). Fortunately, you’ll find a wide variety of food (and drink) options within the festival grounds.

Start the day with a cold brew or other iced coffee drink at Caffe Vita or Capitol Coffee Works, grab some lunchtime tacos at Rancho Bravo or a hearty Caribbean Roast sandwich at Paseo, or cool off with a decadent scoop at Molly Moon’s Homemade Ice Cream. Alternately, browse the Food Truck Rally just north of Pike Street. Don’t wait until you’re already running on empty to seek out food — lines get long on CHBP weekend (especially during peak dining times).

Once you’re properly fueled and ready to party (age and valid ID permitting), just head to the beer garden or any of several bars within festival grounds (including the wacky Unicorn, popular Purr Cocktail Lounge, and many more).

3. Dress for comfort

While you’ll surely want to don your most stylish gear, make sure it stands up to the comfort test. Since you’ll likely be walking, standing, or dancing all day and into the night, start with a comfortable and supportive pair of shoes. Dress in summer-appropriate layers (just bring a small backpack so you don’t lose your favorite light sweater). If you have sensitive ears, make a discreet pair of earplugs an essential part of your ensemble.

4. Remember sun protection

Sunblock is a Block Party-approved item, so make sure to have your SPF 30 (or higher) in your bag all weekend. Re-apply all over every two hours at minimum. Boost your sun protection to the next level with your favorite stylish hat.

5. Stay safe

Above all, having fun is about staying safe. Though security staff will be stationed onsite for crowd control, it’s always wise to remain aware of your surroundings, especially at a packed event like Block Party. Grab a festival map so you know your way around (including where the nearest exits and entrances are located), make sure your phone is fully charged to keep in touch with your group, and if you’re not familiar with this area of the Capitol Hill neighborhood, use the buddy system in case you become separated. As always, if you experience or witness an emergency, call 911.

Happy Block Party, Capitol Hill!

Featured image courtesy of The Capitol Hill Block Party via Facebook

Redhook Brewlab to Open on Cap Hill in August

By Megan Hill

Redhook Brewing will mark a return to its Seattle roots with the grand opening of its Capitol Hill brewpub, the Redhook Brewlab, on August 17. The company was born in 1981 in a former Ballard transmission shop before departing for Woodinville in 1994.

Redhook left Woodinville earlier this year when its parent company, Craft Brew Alliance, decided it no longer needed to hold onto the Woodinville brewery, which was running at only 30-percent capacity.

Brewer Nick Crandall is looking to shake up the traditional Redhook lineup, adding 16 rotating, small-batch beers like the cloudy Bicoastal IPA, a raspberry saison, tangerine IPA, and more. The aim is to brew more than 100 different small-batch beers every year, a goal that will be enabled by a state-of-the-art eight-barrel brewing system, a smallish setup in line with that of many modern craft brewers.

Also among the beers to look forward to are selections from the brewery’s new Washington Native series, which will craft IPAs with ingredients sourced from Washington.

“Redhook was built on experimentation and taking risks back in the early 80s,” Crandall said in a press release. “Redhook Brewlab will allow us to experiment and test brewing boundaries, as well as get feedback directly from our guests. We’ll see what works and what might not. Ultimately, the next generation of Redhook’s core and seasonal beers will be born at Brewlab.”

The Brewlab is also planning to host live music events, and pub-goers will be serenaded by Crandall’s selection of vinyl. The space will be large, able to accommodate some 200 people, and there’s promises of a patio for nice-weather days. There will be food, too: Chef Adam Stevens is crafting a menu centered around a stone-hearth oven.

“I’d describe the menu concept as unabashedly good bar food, the kind of food we like to eat while drinking great beer,” Stevens said. “Our stone-hearth oven, the seasons, and local ingredients will dictate the menu, which will rotate throughout the year. In this way, the food aligns with our beers — we won’t limit ourselves, we’ll be experimental, and we’ll always be having fun.”

The long-delayed project, originally announced in December 2015, was scheduled to open in fall of 2016, but construction got a late start due to permitting issues. Now the project in the Pike Motorworks building at 714 E. Pike Street is finally wrapping up. To celebrate, Redhook and KEXP are throwing a party on August 17, with live music and one-off collaboration beers.

Syndicated from Eater Seattle.

Capitol Hill Real Estate Report – May 2017

capitol hill real estate

Capitol Hill continues to grow as one of Seattle’s favorite neighborhoods. Last month there were 15 single-family homes sold, just two shy from last May (2016), with an average list price of $1,309,927. The highest cost for a home has gone up from $1,995,000 (2016) to $2,620,000 (2017) for residential homes in the area. There were 11 more condo sales last month compared to May of 2016, but prices saw a small drop. The highest price paid for a condo went down from $1,500,000 (2016) to $1,273,950. The average condo list price also had a small drop from $448,284 to $432,700. There are currently 21 active single-family homes and 34 pending. As for condos, there are currently 18 active and 42 pending.

Capitol Hill is a part of “Central Seattle” as defined my Seattle real estate agents. Central Seattle real estate basically includes the area from the Montlake cut to I-90 and from Lake Washington to I-5.  Currently, in this central Seattle area, there are 110 active listings.

Photos Above:

First - Available for purchase $3,600,000

Second - Sold

Tips for Spring Sellers!

 

The flowers are starting to bud, and the sun is peaking through the clouds (on some days); Spring is in the air and For Sale signs are emerging around Seattle. How do you stay ahead of the game? As the housing market begins to heat up, sellers can take these extra steps to help stand out among the rest. At first glance, potential buyers are scrutinizing your property before they even step foot in the door, and having a clean entrance and yard can make a big difference for first impressions.  Adding a beautiful potted plant to the front porch, or staining the front deck could be relatively small projects that could add generous appeal to your home.

Staging your home is another great way to entice buyers to choose your home. Hiring professionals to arrange your home to appeal to a broad array of buyers could be the difference between a buyer choosing your home, or choosing one just down the street. Removing personal belongings helps buyers envision themselves living on the property- not you. Also remember to give your home a good cleaning before showings; a clean home feels bigger and more inviting.

For more information on Seattle real estate, contact your local real estate agent today.

Cold Treats And Warm Hearts At Seattle’s Gelatiamo

Is it ever too cold for ice cream? Honestly, it seems very hard to imagine a scenario in which a delicious, creamy scoop (or two…or three!) of icy cold sweetness doesn’t sound like the perfect treat. Whether you’ve worked hard all week (or day), just finished a terrific workout (it’s called balance, right?!) or the mood just strikes, ice cream is a fabulous choice for a little indulgence, and one most folks can agree on. That is, until you meet ice creams’, intense, delicious and downright beautiful Italian cousin, gelato.

By now, gelato is not a totally unfamiliar word in people’s vocabularies stateside, but many have not actually tried the heavenly concoction, or if they have, they’ve usually purchased it from a grocer’s freezer aisle (no disrespect, but pre-packaged is never as good as fresh, no matter what food you’re talking about). Lucky for us Seattle-ites, we have authentic, amazing, life-changing Italian gelato, homemade, from scratch, DAILY, within reach.

 

Gelatiamo. The name alone indicates the deep love and passion for the art of gelato owner Maria brings to her craft. (if you can’t tell, it’s a combination of the word gelato and “ti amo”, Italian for “I Love You”) One taste of this frozen flavor symphony will have you hooked and likely, in love.

 

Located in a cozy corner space on 3rd and Union, nearby to Benaroya Hall and Tom Douglas’ Wild Ginger, Gelatiamo is a delightfully charming space, manned (or wo-manned) by an equally charming and delightful staff. You are welcomed upon entry with a ’hello’ and a smile warm enough to melt the frozen treats you came for by the lovely staff, eager to help you find your flavor. The environment is very warm and comforting, with a very European vibe, plenty of windows for wonderful natural light, accents of dark wood and charming black and white photographs of the owner hard at work gracing the walls. It’s a very soothing and welcoming space.  
One look around the place will give the sweet-loving indecisive types among us anxiety- the choices are plentiful…and not limited to gelato.  It seems Gelatiamo caters to almost any sweet tooth, offering fabulous baked goods baked in the Italian tradition, including many specialty Italian dessert favorites not common in most bakeries, along with their signature gelato-cakes (much more elegant and delicious than anything from carvel!), and of course, a wide array of gelato.
Every item they serve is handmade daily, from scratch, in house (you can even see the stairs leading down the where the magic happens) from the owners own recipes and recipes that have been in her family for generations. You can taste the years of work, time and dedication that have gone into perfecting not only her gelato, but her cannoli, available filled with traditional custard or chocolate, her Saint Honoré, a traditional Italian cake unlike any you’ll find most places stateside, and at holiday time, her renowned and acclaimed panettone.
Gelatiamos’ owner Maria Coassin began planting her roots in the Seattle food scene back in 1996 when she first opened Gelatiamos’ doors. The only member of her family to have left Italy, she comes from a long line of bakers, with her family having bakeries in northern Italy dating back over 200 years. As a youngster, she saw the demanding life of being a baker, especially the long hours and early mornings, and decided that life was not for her. After marrying an American and moving to the US, she eventually settled in Seattle, and decided it was time to bring her lifelong love of gelato with her.
She knew she had her work cut out for her. Gelato was still relatively unfamiliar to many in the US and what we did have available in the states, was not very good. Maria decided to travel back to Italy to learn the craft the best way possible, from the masters. She spent several months in Italy, taking classes and being mentored by gelato master Pino Scaringelle. It is thanks in no small part to Mr. Scaringelle that Maria does more than just ‘make gelato’, she creates recipes, which is vital to truly well done gelato.
The first winter she opened for business, her father came to visit, bringing with him several family recipes from their long-standing bakery business. Even though Maria insisted Gelatiamo was NOT a bakery, he decided to make some baked goods to sell, including what has now become their famous and hotly sought after panettone. Ever since, the baking component of the business stuck (and we should all be grateful for that!).
Today, Gelatiamo has been a staple of Seattle’s ever growing restaurant scene for 21 years. That’s 21 years of making and serving gelato, baked goods and expertly brewed coffee to Seattle’s increasingly discerning public. Maria is well known and hailed for her incredible baked goods and is considered a gelato master. She travels several times a year to teach others the art of crafting recipes and other essential skills to making truly exceptional gelato.
In 21 years, they’ve never moved, though their location on 3rd and Union has undergone some cosmetic changes in recent years, improving and maintaining the classic elegance of the space Maria has envisioned and established from the start, and transporting her guests, if only for a moment, back to her original home of Italy.
Gelatiamo has a little something for everyone and is truly a gem we in Seattle are lucky enough to claim. If you’ve ever wandered the busy streets of Seattle on a brisk March day and dreamed of that perfect trip to Italy (you know, the one you can’t quite afford yet), consider popping into Gelatiamo for a little something sweet and a perfectly brewed Café Latte. You’ll almost never know the difference.

JOSEPHINE: Homemade Takeout Food

Traci, Josephine cook, prepares to roast brussel sprouts with preserved lemon.                                 Video: Rustic studio in L.A. /posted on Josephine site

A made-in-the-kitchen small business revolution is occurring in Capitol Hill and neighborhoods across Seattle. Josephine, an Oakland, CA-based startup which recently expanded to Seattle in 2016, believes in empowering home chefs to reach their local community, while supplying good meals to neighbors. This blog post happened because of a glowing comment from a current Josephine customer, Jordan L., in Capitol Hill. He enthusiastically recommended their service (see his referral below).

From customer Jordan L.

The two who started this business, Charley and Tal, named it after meeting initially at the warm, welcome home of a mutual friend’s mother Josephine, who invited them over regularly. This spawned discussions over meals about the value of home-cooking and whether we were losing that connection in our world.

 

A reoccurring comment about the Josephine service is that it connects neighbors to other neighbors; sometimes people you wouldn’t meet in your day-to-day, busy life. Customers come pick their food up in a chef’s warm, welcome (and safety-certified) kitchen, after signing up for free at the Josephine site.  After entering your zip code on the site, you will be able to see where chefs are located in your area. Once a week, members receive a newsletter showing the week’s food offerings from different kitchens, and how far they are away from your location.

Weekly Food Offerings near Capitol Hill (varies weekly). Photo: Josephine

This method requires meal planning on your part, since it’s not a delivery service, but many people say the homemade food quality is excellent. Chefs often have repeat customers. The choices are vast: ethnic dishes (that might not be available at restaurants in that neighborhood), vegan, gluten-free, baked goods and American comfort food, to name a few.

Community at cook Akiko’s home. Photo: Josephine / The Seattle Times

“We provide healthy food options, where the money stays in the community,” says Simone Stolzoff, Director of Communications, at Josephine. “You can buy food that reflects individual cooks’ culture; the most authentic representation of what they would feed to their own families.” Dishes are served a la carte, and cooks set their own prices, typically ranging between $8-12 per full meal, according to Stolzoff. In the Seattle area, including Capitol Hill, the local network extends as far north as Lynnwood and as far south as Tacoma.

Cook Shui Zhu’s creations. Photo: The Seattle Times / Josephine

Those approved to cook for Josephine decide what they want to cook and how often, and carry a WA food handlers licence as certification. They pass a safety inspection from Josephine, and two Masters of Public Health are on staff to check-in with new cooks before ever posting their offerings. Mark Bittman, of PBS and cookbook fame, also sits on Josephine’s board. Small business owners receive 90% of the revenue, while 10% goes to Josephine for maintaining the website, marketing home cooks’ meals, and creating a credit payment process for them.

It isn’t always smooth sailing. Although meeting standards for food safety, they have run into problems with government regulation, previously receiving “Cease-and-Desist” orders in California. But legislation continues to be developed and proposed.

A May 19th, 2016 NPR article mentions that Willard Middle School in Berkeley, Calif., has a student-run operation (with supervision) which has partnered with Josephine for the past 3 years. To date, it has brought in over $100,000 in revenue to the school, and is very popular with the locals.

Willard Middle School uses the produce from its school garden to create meals through Josephine.  Photo: Teresa Chin/Youth Radio on NPR.org

As Simone Stolzoff commented upon Josephine’s mission, “More than anything, it’s about connecting people and bringing them together.

 

Film Comes To Life In “Film Is Dead” Exhibit

In the midst of the digital age, many are astounded that film still even exists. Everyone has digital film and video capabilities, and film Is very expensive, so, why bother right?

While that may have been what you thought once upon a time, your mind will be forever changed once you see the brilliant art made on and with film by artist Jennifer West at her Seattle Art Museum installation “Film Is Dead”.

In this revolutionarily inventive show, West uses 70mm, 35mm and 16mm analog film strips to create beautiful and visually compelling works of art. She treats the film with common household items including food coloring, nail polish, coffee, vinegar, bleach and more to create patterns and unplanned but stunning effects by eroding the films emulsion, staining it and letting the film take one whatever characters it might.

West’s SAM exhibit features film strips and remnants that have been treated and manipulated by the artist in this way, hung from the ceiling, and spanning almost the entire length of the gallery.

In addition to the physical installation at SAM, West has taken many of these works and digitized them to create a film that explores the differences and relationship between the analog and digital qualities of the film medium, creating another layer to this thought provoking artistic experiment.

Jennifer West is a Los Angeles based artist with some history in the Seattle. West received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Evergreen State College in Olympia before returning to her home state of California to earn her Masters in Fine Arts from ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena.

West’s works have been displayed in various solo and group exhibitions across the country and the world including Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Lisa Cooley Gallery, New York, NY, Yuz Museum, Shanghai, China, Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, Transmission Gallery, Glasgow, Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland, OR and many more.

Her love affair with film dates back more than ten years and she boasts a very interesting and varied portfolio of works including photographic and video works using different and rare types of film and film techniques, light play, performance and her unique film quilts and magic lantern works. West’s style and aesthetic are likely different from any you’ve seen before, exploring and challenging the differences between modern digital photographic art and classic analog film techniques. Her style simultaneously evokes nostalgic feelings and encapsulates a modern and almost futuristic aesthetic, and over all seems to challenge films obsoleteness and the digital waves supremacy.

If you share a love of visual arts, interesting techniques, the fusion of arts and science or simply subscribe to the thought that everything old is new again, “Film Is Dead” is a show worth seeing, if for no other reason than to see something beautiful before it’s gone.

 

 

 

 

JENNIFER WEST: FILM IS DEAD . . .

Exhibit on display through SUN MAY 7 2017

SEATTLE ART MUSEUM

THIRD FLOOR GALLERIES